Tag Archives: Volunteering

Pitching In

This post is shared with the generous permission of Sweet Tea Reads

Helping Doesn’t Have To Be Overwhelming

First of all, let me just go ahead and say that I realize the pictures have pretty much nothing to do with this post.  I think Howard and Frankie look adorable in them, and I’m tired of almost crying every time I see pictures of wet, pitiful pets.  I thought we could all use a break from that.  Now, on to the actual post.

I think it’s safe to say that everyone has seen far more videos and photos of destruction and loss from Hurricane Harvey than any of us ever wanted to. That level of devastation is hard to fathom.   It seems fair to say that most of us want to help, but some of us aren’t sure how, or if what we do will even make a difference.  Add reports of scams and charities that aren’t all we’d like to hope they are, and knowing how to help becomes even more difficult.

It doesn’t have to be.  I am by no means an expert, but I do seem to know a lot of really smart people who are really good at helping others.  Here are some of the ways I’ve seen people helping that seem like good ideas to me:

Start with Charity Navigator.  I love this site.  If you’re not familiar, they rate charities on their practices and how they spend their money.  It’s an excellent resource in determining who to donate to.  Most of us have a finite amount of money, and don’t want to turn it over to just anyone.  There’s a special section right now for Hurricane Harvey relief, so you can make sure your funds are put to the best use possible.

Donate supplies through your employer if they’re doing a collection.  One of the court security officers started a collection of supplies from the courthouse, detention center, and Sheriff’s Office in our county to be delivered to Hearts With Hands, as well as supplies to be delivered directly to the Houston Police Department from the Sheriff’s Office.  She handed out a list of items needed to all of the offices in the three buildings and designated a collection point in each building.

I thought this was a particularly good idea.  I’ve read that donating supplies can be tricky because of the logistics of getting them to the people who need them, but by delivering them to a charity who can coordinate delivery and distribution, that problem is solved.  Being given a long list to work with makes it easy for everyone to get involved.  It’s easy to add one or two things from the list to your weekly grocery shopping and take them into work the next day.  For those of us who coupon and sale shop, we already had some of the items requested on hand.  This gave us a way to share them.

Choose what matters most to you to help with.  Unfortunately, we can’t all give money and supplies to every worthy organization helping with relief efforts.  I think a good way to decide is to help a cause that you’re passionate about.  For us that typically means animal rescues and first responders. For Nick’s mom and step-dad, it has been animal shelters and a program to replace school books.  A coworker of mine chose to send an Amazon order of diapers to one of the diaper banks.  We’re all different, and we all have different needs, passions, and ideas.  Think about what you might want or need the most if you were in that situation.

Don’t hesitate to step up and organize something if you see a way to fill a need.  Someone had to get the collections started at work, and I think we’re all grateful to the officer who did.  It’s surprisingly easy to coordinate a group effort.  I saw a post on Chewy.com’s Facebook wall from a volunteer at the San Antonio Humane Society asking if they could donate kitten milk replacer, puppy milk replacer, canned kitten food, and canned puppy food.  That seemed like something I  could coordinate, being no stranger to ordering pet supplies online.  I posted on Facebook asking if anyone wanted to contribute to sending them a box.  Nick’s mom got involved as well, and within 24 hours we raised over $220.00 for the supplies they had asked for.  There’s now a box with needed items on the way to them.  It’s a small thing in the grand scheme of what’s needed, but I’m telling you about it just to show you that it’s not difficult to pick something you care about, and coordinate an effort to help.

Consider donating closer to home to help with relief efforts. Is your state, county, or city sending a swift water rescue team, or other volunteers to help?  Consider making a donation to them to help with those costs, or to use as they see fit in the affected areas.  Contact some of your local emergency response agencies to see if they’re collecting supplies to send to similar agencies in affected areas.

Don’t underestimate the value of doing one relatively small thing.  It’s so easy to feel like what we’re able to do won’t be enough to make a difference in such a huge disaster.  Everything counts, though.  I think that’s the beauty of so many people helping one another.  Don’t feel like your monetary donation doesn’t matter because it’s not a huge amount, or your supplies aren’t enough to bother with.  If you what you’re able to give is one dollar, or one package to a bin for supplies, then do it.  None of us can do everything, but most of us can do something.

So what about you?  Have you discovered any ways to help that are especially meaningful to you? Are you aware of a particular need of a particular organization?  Please feel free to share your ideas in the comments for any of us still looking for a way to help.

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For the Love of Poetry

(contributed by Susan Ray)

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Although April is actually National Poetry Month, it’s never too soon to delight in the song, the truth, the joy, the diversity that is poetry.

Mona/Jane kept books of poems at her bedside always. She found comfort, peace and wisdom in poetry that was especially welcome at the end of the day. Mona/Jane loved the beauty, the melody of the words, and encouraged those new to poetry to enjoy the fun of the language. She shared her gift of connecting with the poet by inviting new readers to imagine what the poet might have seen, felt, experienced when writing.

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A few of her cherished, better known poets were W.H. AudenChristina Rossetti, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Emily Dickinson, Rainer Maria Rilke, Walt Whitman, Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and perhaps her favorite, Robert Frost.

 

 

On Jane’s Day of Service this February 28th, consider the following ways in which you can share Mona/Jane’s lifelong love for poetry:

  • Memorizing a poem that holds special meaning to you
  • Reading poetry aloud to your child’s classroom
  • Posting an uplifting poem on the bulletin board at work
  • Sharing your family’s favorite poetry with the elderly at a local nursing home
  • Sitting down and writing some poems of your very own

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Forbearance

Ralph Waldo Emerson, 18031882

Hast thou named all the birds without a gun?
Loved the wood-rose, and left it on its stalk?
At rich men’s tables eaten bread and pulse?
Unarmed, faced danger with a heart of trust?
And loved so well a high behavior,
In man or maid, that thou from speech refrained,
Nobility more nobly to repay?
O, be my friend, and teach me to be thine!

 

You are always welcome to contribute your ideas and suggestions in the Comments below, and please join others in sharing your poetry and  photos of the ways you’ve chosen to participate in Jane’s Day of Service on our Facebook page:

http://www.facebook.com/JanesDayOfService/

Babies Are the Hope of the Future

(contributed by Susan Ray)

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Mona/Jane adored babies. She always believed that each new, fresh, wonderful child welcomed into the world brought with him or her a bright hope for the future. She always said any baby could grow up to change the world for the better.

As an only child, she had a very lonely  childhood, so always dreamed of one day having a home filled with babies and children and love. One of the programs she hoped to become more involved with were those allowing volunteers to hold and comfort very small and/or very ill babies.

Although some medical centers welcome ‘cuddlers’, some hospitals prefer the community care for these most fragile of babies in other ways, such as crocheting blankets for them, knitting caps, donating preemie diapers to the family, or by taking advantage of other less hands-on, but just as necessary opportunities.

If snuggling with these tiny bundles of sweetness and hope is something that you’ve always wanted to do, please check with your local medical community to find the ways you can best support the newborns in need of so much love and care and cuddling. Below are a few links to get you started:

http://www.carolinashealthcare.org/types-of-levine-childrens-hospital-volunteers-lch

http://womanshospital.com/about/volunteers.dot

http://www.methodisthealthsystem.org/Volunteeropportunities

http://www.thepreemieproject.com/links

Thank you.

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A Passion for Gardening

(Contributed by Susan Ray)

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Jane’s Day of Service on February 28th, is the perfect time to begin your garden and/or volunteer with your local community garden! Mona/Jane always said that the winter months are perfect for perusing seed catalogues, and ideal for reviewing notes from last year’s garden to learn which plants flourished and which varieties might have struggled. Snowy days offer the best opportunity to reassess, to dream, to plan – and to order early lettuce and unusual green bean seeds!

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Mona/Jane loved to share her garden with family and friends. As her granddaughter-in-law and I can attest, every plant came with information and a tutorial. Mint, sage, thyme and savory are all in the same family of plants. Carrots like stone-free, loose soil, whereas squash is practically a weed, so it will grow almost anywhere given space and sunlight.

Finding the place in the yard where a plant is ‘happy’ is vital, as is knowing each one’s characteristics. For example, tomatoes are delighted when borage, peppers and basil share a large container pot, but those same tomato plants will suffer if cabbages and cauliflower are not grown some distance away.

One of the many ways you can take part in Jane’s Day of Service is by planting a few flower or vegetable seeds in a flower pot on your windowsill or get involved with your local community garden. If you have no interest in plants beyond enjoying the fragrance of a flower, you can adopt a garden in New England, in CincinnatiKansas City, New York City – almost anywhere in the US.

Another option if you are one of those special and much-appreciated Green Thumbers is to teach current and new generations about the benefits of gardening by becoming a Master Gardener,  or by teaching a class to local 4-H members.

 

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If you’d rather not commit to a garden, but enjoy crafts, love spring and find joy in brightening other people’s gray days, you can easily make living baskets for friends or as gifts to drop off at a senior center or youth home.

One of Mona/Jane’s favorite projects was creating grass and flower filled baskets for living Easter or Mother’s Day baskets complete with miniature rakes, benches, and dyed eggs.

These are really quite easy to make and can be as simple or as extravagant as your time and imagination allow.

  • Begin with any size basket – thrift stores have plenty to choose from during the colder months.
  • Line the inside with a hole-free plastic bag. Make sure there are no splits or tears that might allow water to seep through later.
  • Fill with good quality dirt, then plant wheat berries or grass seed.
  • Water generously, but do not make a soup of seeds and dirt.
  • Place basket in sunny place and keep moist, not wet – and out of the reach of pets if indeed you’d like a healthy crop of green in approximately two weeks.
  • As the grass grows, you might need to ‘mow’ it occasionally with a pair of scissors.
  • When ready to give the basket as a gift, poke the stems of cut flowers into the soil, tuck miniature eggs beneath the lush grass, or place small figures, and/or gardening tools on low-cut plots of grass. (If feeling especially gardenny, include small, living flowering plants such as miniature daisies or carpet tulips, etc.)
  • Be sure to include a note about the need to provide sunlight and water for the plants, and ways in which the contents can be composted and recycled.

This is a fun way an individual or a group can participate in Jane’s Day of Service and share their love of gardening and flowers with folks who might need a little more sunshine in their lives. It’s relatively inexpensive, but the happiness it brings is priceless!

Please let us know how you used your love of plants and/or crafting to take part in Jane’s Day of Service. We’d love to see – and share – your photos, too!

Thank you.

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Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Events

martin-luther-king-180477_1920For almost 50 years, people throughout the world have not only remembered Dr. King, but have put his profound lessons and peaceful message to work.

On the third Monday of every January, men, women, and children participate in acts of service, connect with their own and different faith communities, and search for opportunities to carry on the dream in ways that have personal meaning to them.

If you need ideas for ways to participate, or if you’d like to share more links to local events, please visit the CONNECT page, above.

Please share your own plans for celebrating the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in the comments section below, and/or on our Facebook page:

http://www.facebook.com/JanesDayOfService/

 

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Thank you for sharing your experiences and for your service.

 

 

Women in Black

Every Friday afternoon throughout the world, women of different faiths, different cultures, and different political views are united in silent vigil against violence, war and injustice. Meeting at a specific location on a regular basis, these women – and sometimes men – hold signs, wear black and remain peaceful.

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The current form of Women in Black began in 1988, when Jewish women and Palestinian women  stood in silent protest to occupation and war. Over time more and more women in more and more countries joined this movement – lending their silent support to the stand against war, violence and injustice. These demonstrators do not yell, chant or incite – instead they act quietly with dignity, strength and conviction.

http://www.womeninblack.org/old/en/history

Anyone can join these ongoing groups, and anyone can organize their own silent protest. This is less a group as it is a gathering; a place and time for people to come together to take a common stand for justice, for understanding, for peace.

For more information, please visit:

http://womeninblack.org/

Compassion in Action

WHEN:

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

WHAT:

Jane’s Day of Service – a day spent doing what YOU feel will bring more peace, more harmony, more happiness to your corner of the world. You might read to the visually impaired, or take your neighbor’s trash can to the curb, or write a thank you note to someone you’ve been impacted by recently. Or you might take some breakfast cereal or cans of beef stew to a food pantry, or give flowers to a stranger waiting for a bus … whatever moves you, whatever matters to you. That’s the thing to do.

WHO:

You and me and everyone we know. This day offers everyone an opportunity to realize that alone or with friends -each and every one of us can make a substantial difference in the life experience of another person. We do have choices. Even if we might not be able to change the world – we can definitely brighten one corner of the universe we know best.

WHY:

Because the world needs people to show up, to love and care for one another actively – and to find positive outlets for worry and frustration instead of bemoaning the truth that ‘somebody ought to do something about that’. Yes – someone should – and that someone is me and you. No matter how small the act – it’s the action, the choice to DO that makes all the difference.

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To honor and remember my beloved mother

Mona