Tag Archives: Green Thumbs

A Passion for Gardening

(Contributed by Susan Ray)

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Jane’s Day of Service on February 28th, is the perfect time to begin your garden and/or volunteer with your local community garden! Mona/Jane always said that the winter months are perfect for perusing seed catalogues, and ideal for reviewing notes from last year’s garden to learn which plants flourished and which varieties might have struggled. Snowy days offer the best opportunity to reassess, to dream, to plan – and to order early lettuce and unusual green bean seeds!

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Mona/Jane loved to share her garden with family and friends. As her granddaughter-in-law and I can attest, every plant came with information and a tutorial. Mint, sage, thyme and savory are all in the same family of plants. Carrots like stone-free, loose soil, whereas squash is practically a weed, so it will grow almost anywhere given space and sunlight.

Finding the place in the yard where a plant is ‘happy’ is vital, as is knowing each one’s characteristics. For example, tomatoes are delighted when borage, peppers and basil share a large container pot, but those same tomato plants will suffer if cabbages and cauliflower are not grown some distance away.

One of the many ways you can take part in Jane’s Day of Service is by planting a few flower or vegetable seeds in a flower pot on your windowsill or get involved with your local community garden. If you have no interest in plants beyond enjoying the fragrance of a flower, you can adopt a garden in New England, in CincinnatiKansas City, New York City – almost anywhere in the US.

Another option if you are one of those special and much-appreciated Green Thumbers is to teach current and new generations about the benefits of gardening by becoming a Master Gardener,  or by teaching a class to local 4-H members.

 

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If you’d rather not commit to a garden, but enjoy crafts, love spring and find joy in brightening other people’s gray days, you can easily make living baskets for friends or as gifts to drop off at a senior center or youth home.

One of Mona/Jane’s favorite projects was creating grass and flower filled baskets for living Easter or Mother’s Day baskets complete with miniature rakes, benches, and dyed eggs.

These are really quite easy to make and can be as simple or as extravagant as your time and imagination allow.

  • Begin with any size basket – thrift stores have plenty to choose from during the colder months.
  • Line the inside with a hole-free plastic bag. Make sure there are no splits or tears that might allow water to seep through later.
  • Fill with good quality dirt, then plant wheat berries or grass seed.
  • Water generously, but do not make a soup of seeds and dirt.
  • Place basket in sunny place and keep moist, not wet – and out of the reach of pets if indeed you’d like a healthy crop of green in approximately two weeks.
  • As the grass grows, you might need to ‘mow’ it occasionally with a pair of scissors.
  • When ready to give the basket as a gift, poke the stems of cut flowers into the soil, tuck miniature eggs beneath the lush grass, or place small figures, and/or gardening tools on low-cut plots of grass. (If feeling especially gardenny, include small, living flowering plants such as miniature daisies or carpet tulips, etc.)
  • Be sure to include a note about the need to provide sunlight and water for the plants, and ways in which the contents can be composted and recycled.

This is a fun way an individual or a group can participate in Jane’s Day of Service and share their love of gardening and flowers with folks who might need a little more sunshine in their lives. It’s relatively inexpensive, but the happiness it brings is priceless!

Please let us know how you used your love of plants and/or crafting to take part in Jane’s Day of Service. We’d love to see – and share – your photos, too!

Thank you.

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